Child pages
  • Myles Assignment 7.1

Lucy Myles

Intro to GIS

Assignment 7

 

Project Overview

This project will be a suitability analysis for regional food hubs (RFH). The working definition of a RFH is:

A centrally located facility with a business management structure facilitating the aggregation, storage, processing, distribution, and/or marketing of locally/regionally produced food products.

 

RFHs can serve to increase access to locally and regionally produced food by widening the distribution of small agricultural producers who have traditionally relied heavily on direct market sales. Hubs provide a way for these producers to reach more consumers and reduce their time spent on marketing activities .

 

In this analysis I will first look at the characteristics of counties with established food hubs in order to identify attributes of these areas. I will use county level data from a variety of government sources including the US population census, the USDA agricultural census, and the BLS economic census to compare statistics of key variables in food hub counties to national level statistics.

 

In phase 2 of this analysis I will use the finding from phase 1 to identify other counties with suitable characteristics for food hubs.

 

 

Data Inputs:

Concept

Variable

Data source

Food hub county characteristics

Existing Food Hubs

Working list from Food Hub Collaborative

Food production

Commercial fishing

2007 economic census

Small farms with < $250,000 in annual sales

2007 agricultural census

Regional transportation and storage infrastructure and services

National road systems

2002 StreetMap USA

Refrigerated warehouse and storage

2007 economic census

Farm product warehouse and storage (non-refrigerated)

2007 economic census

Local freight trucking

2007 economic census

Regional food processing infrastructure and services

F&V freezing

2007 economic census

F&V canning, drying, pickling

2007 economic census

F&V freezing

2007 economic census

Animal slaughter and processing

2007 economic census

Seafood prep and packaging

2007 economic census

Value-added: Food access

# SNAP-authorized stores, 2009

Food Environment Atlas

Avg monthly # SNAP participants, 2010

Food Environment Atlas

# WIC-authorized stores, 2009

Food Environment Atlas

Avg monthly # WIC participants, 2010

Food Environment Atlas

Value-added: Supporting disadvantaged producers

# of limited resources small farms

2007 agricultural census

% minority primary producer

2007 agricultural census

Value-added: environmental services

Percent organic of total farmland

2007 agricultural census

Percent organic of total producers

2007 agricultural census

% farms using conservation methods

2007 agricultural census

Demand for local/regional food using direct marketing as proxy measure

Number of farm to school program

Food Environment Atlas

Number of farms with direct sales

2007 agricultural census

% Farms with direct sales

2007 agricultural census

% Farm sales $ direct to consumer

2007 agricultural census

# of farmers markets

AMS Farmers Market Database

Potential markets for food hubs

Colleges, universities, and professional schools

2007 economic census

Elementary and secondary schools

2007 economic census

Hospitals

2007 economic census

# of grocery stores in 2008

Food Environment Atlas

# of specialized food stores in 2008

Food Environment Atlas

 

Data steps:

  1. Download data from data sources (see steps on downloading data below)
  2. Prepare data in excel for GIS import with matching FIPS code (see appendix for steps on creating 5 digit FIPS)
  3. Import excel spreadsheets to ArcGIS and perform table join with 2000 census county shape file using FIPS as join point (remembering to save the resulting new table to the H drive)
  4. Project all data layers to the same coordinate system
  5. Geocode existing food hubs using 2000 census county zip code shape file
  6. Geocode farmers market locations from the AMS Farmers Market Database using 2002 StreetMap USA
  7. Develop composite scores for each concept by performing a ranking overlay
  8. Look at the characteristics of the counties with existing food hubs compared to all US counties
    1. Average food production score
    2. Average Regional transportation and storage infrastructure and services score
    3. Average regional food processing infrastructure and services
    4. Average value-added: Food access score
    5. Average value-added: environmental services score
    6. Average value-added: Supporting disadvantaged producers score
    7. Average demand for local/regional food using direct marketing as proxy measure score
    8. Average potential markets for food hubs score
  9. Identify other US counties that have a number of matching characteristics with the food hub counties. Try a few different maps using different characteristic criteria. This will represent potential food hub locations with different focuses or missions (eg. focused on increasing food access, or focus on serving small producers)

 

Products:

  1. Map of existing food hub locations
  2. Table showing characteristics of food hub counties
  3. 3-4 maps showing other potential food hub counties based on different input variables

 

Downloading and preparing tabular data:

Downloading data from NASS Quick Stats:

Start here: http://quickstats.nass.usda.gov/

  1. Select: commodity Geographic location Time (the page will update to provide choices after each selection)
  2. Select the “get data” button once everything has been selected
  3. View the table to make sure it’s the data you want and then select “spreadsheet” from the options in the upper right to download in excel format.
  4. Note: Ag census data is only available through the Quick Stats tool from 1997 onwards. For older data you have to look up the tables: http://www.agcensus.usda.gov/

 

Downloading data from the Food Environment Atlas:

Start here: http://www.ers.usda.gov/foodatlas/

  1. Select download data in the upper right tab
  2. Select the download button on this page for all of the Food Environment Atlas data in a single spreadsheet ready for import into ArcGIS

 

Downloading Economic Census data from American Factfinder:

Start here: http://www.census.gov/cgi-bin/sssd/naics/naicsrch?chart_code=61&search=2007%20NAICS%20Search

  1. Find desired NAICS code(s)

Then go here: http://factfinder.census.gov/servlet/IBQTable?_bm=y&-ds_name=CB0700A1

  1. From the menu bar at the top, Filter Filter Rows.
  2. On the first line, type in the 6-digit NCAIS code, and hit Search .
  3. The Code and the Industry will appear in the box just below.  Highlight that line and hit Add .
  4. After the same Code and Industry appear in box below Add, highlight that entry and hit Show Results .
  5. Under Options , choose “ Select Columns ” and check off the box marked Geographic Identifier Code (this is the combined 5-digit FIPS)
  6. Click on Update (if you don’t want the number of employees etc, you can de-select those options under that same check-box place)
  7. Under Print/Download on toolbar, select Download .
  8. In the popup window, select OK. 

 

Creating 5 digit FIPS in excel for successful GIS table joins

  1. Most of the geographic identifyers provide the state FIPS and the county FIPS in separate columns. However, for the purpose of joining it is necessary to have them together as a single 5 digit code (2 digit state code and 3 digit county code)
  2. Put the state FIPS codes in column A and the county FIPS codes in column B.
  3. In column C paste this code: =TEXT( A2 ,"00")&TEXT( B2 ,"000")
  4. Copy all of column C and select “past special”. Select the “value” option. This will transfer the FIPS column from a formula to number.